Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors

Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors

The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital is dedicated to saving Australia’s many native species.

Objective

Increased urbanization into the koala’s natural habitat is the leading risk facing koalas today, as the ever-expanding human footprint means koalas are being hit by vehicles and attacked by dogs.

The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, opened in March 2004 and located next to the Australia Zoo at Beerwah in Queensland, Australia is dedicated to saving Australia’s many native species.

The Wildlife Hospital treats an average of 7,500 sick, injured and orphaned wildlife patients every year – at absolutely no cost to the public. The partnership with The TreadRight Foundation helps Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors continue with its mission to provide care to endangered animals as well as showcase Australia’s iconic wildlife to the 75,000 visitors who walk through its doors every year.

 

Impact

AAT Kings and TreadRight have contributed $48,000 in order to help the hospital rehabilitate and care for injured and orphaned koalas, as well as build an eco-friendly facility to house the animals.

In addition to contributing towards the cost of helping koalas, AAT Kings will be educating its guests about its commitment to wildlife conservation and sustainable tourism through a series of initiatives that will involve guest participation.

In July 2014, AAT Kings introduced its company mascot: Koala Sam. The sale of Koala Sam cuddly plush animals to AAT Kings’ guests will help provide much needed additional funds for the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, as well as educate travellers about the koala rehabilitation project and help further communicate the vital message of the necessity for animal conservation.

In 2015, AAT Kings introduced Kiwi Sam to fly the flag for New Zealand’s iconic, native bird, the kiwi, and to help protect this endangered species. Funds raised from the sale of Kiwi Sam plush animials help support the Rainbow Springs Kiwi Breeding Program in Rotorua. This project is helping to hatch and raise kiwi chicks with daily monitoring and regular health checks, as well as fund important research into kiwi incubation and rearing.